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Pay scale in the UK Army explained

If you’re thinking about joining the Army, the pay is probably one of the last things you’ll be considering. What you’ll be asked to do, where you’ll be posted, the dangers you’ll be facing and the honour of doing your duty will probably be at the forefront of your mind. Thankfully, the pay scale for the UK Army is pretty rewarding.

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Training

You can expect a decent rate of pay from the first training day but your pay will rise as you get experience and with promotions. There’s a chance that you could earn up to three pay rises each year. Your food, accommodation and travel are subsidised so your earning will go that bit further.

X-Factor

The Army has a system they’ve labelled the X-Factor. Thankfully, it’s nothing to do with singing. Instead, it’s an adjustment to your wage that makes sure you’re getting a great deal. The Army takes the wage amount paid in a similar role in civilian life, add in a little money because of the challenges faced in the Army, takes a little away because soldiers get 38 days paid leave, and then spits out a wage figure that’s on average 14.5% higher than the equivalent civilian post.

Regular Officer

If you become a Regular Officer, you’ll earn a training salary of £25,220. When you become Second Lieutenant this will rise to £30,314. If you become Captain, the wages rise to £38,847.

Regular Soldier

There’s a weekly payment of £278 while in Phase 1 training. This goes up to a minimum of £17,945 a year depending on which Army job you do. Specialist roles offer more money and your salary will increase each year regardless of promotion. If you reach the rank of Corporal, you’ll take home at least £27,053.

Army Reserve

If you’re thinking of serving in your spare time, you’ll earn the same pay rate as your colleagues in the Regular Army. This could be a great way of taking home some extra money, especially as you’ll be paid for the time spent on training and the time taken to travel to your unit.

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