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Career guide & advice: court administrative officer jobs

Would you like to work in a legal environment? Court administrative officer jobs present exciting and rewarding career prospect in courts of law. Court administrative officers and assistants help with the smooth running of day to day tasks of courts and their supporting departments and offices. If you have an interest in the law, enjoy being part of a team and like keeping things in order, the work of a court administrative officer or assistant might be the perfect job for you.

Duties and responsibilities

The work of a court administrative officer entails booking dates and times for court hearings, allocating cases to court rooms and creating lists that show the court sessions for the day. Additionally, as court administrative officer, you will be responsible for collecting reports and records on each case for a magistrate or judge, carrying out court orders after a hearing and dealing with enquiries from the public.

As you gain more experience, your duties may include assisting court clerks in taking notes of court session. In time, you may even specialise in sections/departments of courts, such as fees and fines department where you collect fines, send out compensation payments or even produce summonses. Evidently, the opportunities for career advancements are plenty. Normal office work hours run 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday.

Qualifications and training

Entry level qualifications for court administrative officer jobs vary, depending on the court you work in. For example, magistrate courts require candidates to have at least A levels/Highers, but most prefer candidates with three GCSEs (A-C)/S grades (1-3), including English and Math.

Generally, though, you will require at least two GCSEs (A-C) including Math and English to qualify for administrative assistant in HM Courts Service. To qualify for administrative officer in HM Courts Service, you will need at least five GCSEs (A-C) including English.

All new staff get on-the-job training and induction. You will be trained at your work place and possibly attend short in-house or external courses to develop you as a good team player and bring your skills up to standards. Training courses may also involve pursuing nationally recognised qualifications in business and administration.

Pay

The starting salary for court administrative assistants in the UK is anywhere between £12,824 and £14,912 a year. Middle and senior court administrative officers can earn between £14,551 and £19,200 a year. Not too bad for a career option, is it?

If you work well in your team, follow instructions and avoid becoming too emotionally attached to distressing cases, there is no reason why court administrative officer jobs cannot lead to a long and satisfying career in the law.

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